By Kim Traynor - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=21286316

Vote Geology

Prof Robert Jameson (1774-1854)

The National Library of Scotland (NLS) has a new display in the front hall of the George IV Bridge building in Edinburgh. The display features three diverse collections in need of conservation treatment, including a selection of 20th century booklets, a group of geological charts and a volume of 20 historical pamphlets. All of the items will be conserved but the winner of a vote which runs until the 8th September, will have its treatment documented under the social media hashtag #Rescueme.

The geological charts are those produced by Robert Jameson (1774-1854), Professor of Natural Sciences at the University of Edinburgh and where he taught both Darwin and Forbes.  He also produced a book on the mineralogy of the Western Isles. It would clearly be good to see his drawings better preserved and also to be able to follow this on social media.

To give the geological charts the best chance of winning, we need your votes either by visiting the George IV Bridge building or alternatively by using the buttons on the Twitter feed @natlibscot

Please note that NLS is open until 7pm Mon-Thur and until 5pm Fri-Sat.  Closed Sun.  The vote closes on the 8th September.

Raised dinosaur print

Dinosaur footprints discovered on mainland Scotland for first time

Raised dinosaur print

Raised dinosaur print by Dr. Neil Clark

Evidence of fossilised dinosaur footprints has been found on the Scottish mainland for the first time, on the coast near Inverness. The exact location is being kept secret to enable researchers to have access to the site. The discovery, by Dr. Neil Clark, Vice-President of the Geological Society of Glasgow and Curator of Palaeontology at the Hunterian in Glasgow, has been hailed as a significant find. The main site for dinosaur footprints and bones in Scotland is on the Isle of Skye and this significant new find is likely to give further insight into the dinosaurs of the Middle Jurassic period, some 170 million years ago. It is thought that the size of the newly discovered prints suggests they were left by a member of the sauropod family – large herbivores which stood up to 18 metres high.

 

This news item is to linked to a previous story posted on the EGS website – Preserving dinosaur footprint sites in Scotland.

The website team at work

The EGS website team

team at work

Our website, designed by EGS member Gordon Lang, is maintained by a small team of volunteer members. We meet every two months or so for training workshops where we discuss what updates are needed to keep the website fresh and how to make the necessary changes. Some of us are IT-savvy and some are less so, but we are all learning from each other and find it rewarding. Are you an EGS member who would like to help?  Please contact the EGS Secretary at secretary@edinburghgeolsoc.org.

Written Evidence

The Future of the UK Oil and Gas Industry

Professor Roy Thompson of the University of Edinburgh has supplied written evidence to the Scottish Affairs Committee Inquiry (at Westminster) into The Future of the Oil and Gas Industry. This evidence comes as a follow-up to his article in The Edinburgh Geologist (Autumn 2017) on ‘Can fracking, for gas and oil, power the Scottish economy?’.  His key point is that, despite the North Sea being a geologically well-studied, mature oil-province, surprisingly large discrepancies remain over best estimates of oil and gas reserves. Estimates currently vary between 4.8 and 80 billion barrels of oil equivalent (bboe) for the UK continental shelf. This corresponds to a difference to Scotland’s economy of about $4 trillion – assuming approximately 90% of the oil lies in Scottish waters and commands an average price of $90 per barrel. His recommendation is that in order to determine the likely size of the UK’s ultimately recoverable oil and gas reserves, a poll of stakeholders be conducted, asking each to provide a quantitative, evidence-based estimate of economically viable production potential.

Written Evidence

Preserving dinosaur footprint sites in Scotland

Sauropod footprint on Skye. Image courtesy Steve Brusatte.

The Edinburgh Geological Society has been contacted by Dr Neil Clark (Curator of Palaeontology, The Hunterian, University of Glasgow) regarding a campaign to raise £5,000 to undertake mapping of some new dinosaur footprint sites in Scotland. The new locations will it is claimed add significantly to the understanding of Middle Jurassic dinosaurs. The funding is to go towards the purchase of suitable drone to help with the mapping and photographic record of the footprints as well as 3D software to undertake referenced measurements of the rate of erosion from stormy seas in future years. The funding will also support student engagement in the project with transport and accommodation costs. A number of researchers from both Scottish Universities and Institutions are involved in this exciting geoconservation project.

The project has created a crowdfunding site for those interested in offering financial support to the project.
https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/scottish-dinosaurs

For further details, please contact Neil.Clark@glasgow.ac.uk

Front cover of guide

Moine Guide – reprinted 2018

News from our Publications Sales Officer, Don Cameron is that the Moine Guide has now been reprinted.  He has a good stock of guides available for EGS members at the reduced price of £14.40.  The non-members rate is £17.99.  Please contact Don if you would like to purchase a copy.

Front cover of guide

Front cover of Moine guide

 

New_EGS GSG Perth

EGS / GSG joint trip to Perth, Saturday 30 June 2018

The annual joint field trip with the Glasgow Geological Society took place to Perth City and surrounding Kinnoull Hill on Saturday 30th June 2018. The visit was led by Con Gillen (EGS) and examined both the Devonian volcanic and sedimentary rocks (Lower Devonian) of the surrounding area. The later rocks being famous for supplying the source rock for the Stone of Destiny. In addition, the trip also included ample opportunity to see the wide range of building stones used in Perth City Centre. The large group, approx. 30 members enjoyed the expert guidance of Con (along with the impressive work of those who compiled the Perth Excursion Guide). The splendid sunny day enabled us to capture the group in the Rodney Gardens, Perth – where lunch was had. The day also ended with a lovely high tea to round off another great field excursion.

New_EGS GSG Perth

EGS / GSG Perth 30 June 2018 (by Beverly Bergman)

Edinburgh Geocoin

The Edinburgh EarthCache Geocoin

Edinburgh GeocoinTo celebrate the rich variety of Edinburgh’s geology and the number of Earthcaches in the area, the Edinburgh Geological Society has produced a souvenir Edinburgh Earthcache Geocoin. This is an attractive trackable silver coin with views of Edinburgh Castle and Salisbury Crags. Find out more about Earthcaches and purchase the souvenir coin here.

Edinburgh Building Stone

From quarry to quoin: a conservation guide to stonework – training session Tuesday 19 June

This CPD training session on stonework is one of a series organised by Edinburgh World Heritage. These are opportunities for conservation architects, planners, students and any other interested parties to learn about specific aspects of the management of the built environment of the World Heritage Site.

It is taking place on Tuesday 19 June, 9am-1pm at Walpole Hall, next to St Mary’s Cathedral in the West End. Tickets are on sale now, with a discount for EWH members.

As the saying goes, we aim to leave no stone unturned when it comes to discussing stonework. The event will explore all aspects of stonework from the quarry to the workshop and beyond. It will be an opportunity to learn about the life-cycle of stone, how it is utilised in conservation work and how best it can be maintained and preserved. There will also be the chance to learn from the masons at St Mary’s Cathedral with a practical workshop demonstration. The RIAS is happy to recommend this event to its members, and it is recognised by the IHBC for CPD.

Speakers and their topics include:

  • Marcus Paine, Hutton Stone: Quarries
  • Katie Strang, Scottish Lime Centre: Geology
  • Luis Albornoz, British Geological Survey: Stone matching
  • Christa Gerwilker, Historic Environment Scotland: Stone conservation approaches
  • Maggie Tennant, St Mary’s Cathedral Workshop: Health and safety when working with stone
  • Jordan Kirk, St Mary’s Cathedral Workshop: Practical demonstration
  • Fiona MacDonald, Edinburgh World Heritage: Grants case study

Friends of Hugh Miller AGM in Edinburgh, Saturday 16 June

Image by Elekhh – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0

The Friends of Hugh Miller are embarking on an ambitious “relaunch” including of our internal structure and external activities, and an element of this expansion is the decision to move our next annual meeting from Cromarty to Scotland’s capital for the first time in our twelve year history. All members and friends welcome!

The AGM takes place on Saturday 16th June, 10.30am at the Scottish Poetry Library 5 Crichton’s Cl, Edinburgh EH8 8DT. It is purposefully arranged to take place on the same day and at the same venue as the Awards ceremony for the winners of the second national Hugh Miller Writing Competition, in which we are one of the partners.

We are specially inviting individual members of our affiliates to attend our AGM including members of Edinburgh Geological Society, which was one of the grant funders for our successful conference last September, “The Old Red: Hugh Miller’s Geological Legacy”.
At the meeting, we will be displaying specimens from a newly donated collection of fossils found on the North East coast of Scotland, including in local deposits at Cromarty and Eathie, as well as a rare Miller artefact. Full details of the meeting will be included in the next edition of our newsletter, Hugh’s News Issue No 35,Summer 2018,  which will be emailed to our members and posted on our website www.thefriendsofhughmiller.org.uk.