EGS Workshop: The North West Highlands Geopark

Saturday 27 October 2018

The North West Highlands UNESCO Global Geopark spans 2000 sq km of mountain, peatland, beach, forest and coastline north of Ullapool, including some of the most well-known and important rocks in the UK.

Edinburgh Geological Society are organising a half-day workshop in central Edinburgh on Saturday 27 October, 11am. The workshop will focus on the work of the Geopark, explore the historical development of ideas about thrusting and mountain building and give an overview of the modern understanding of the Moine Thrust Belt. This is a great opportunity for anyone interested in geology to find out more about the Geopark, the UNESCO Global Geoparks network, and the geological story of one of Scotland’s most iconic regions.

Students exploring the geology of the Moine Thrust Belt at Knockan Crag. Photo: Rob Butler

The event will include short presentations from Laura Hamlet and Pete Harrison from the North West Highlands Geopark and scientific overview from Rob Butler and Clare Bond (University of Aberdeen). There will be stalls from other organisations, loads of resources to browse and plenty of opportunity for informal discussion.

Date & time: Saturday 27 October 2018, 11am – 3pm

Venue: Southside Community Centre, 117 Nicolson Street, Edinburgh EH8 9ER. The venue is a short walk from Waverley Station.

Tickets: £15 (£10 students) including lunch. Booking essential – reserve your ticket at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3620756

Find out more:

North West Highlands UNESCO Global Geopark

51 Best Places to see Scotland’s Geology – including Smoo Cave, Scourie Bay and Laxford, Loch Glencoul and Knockan Crag NNR

EGS members on Shetland

New tsunami evidence found on Shetland

EGS members on Shetland

EGS members examine the Storegga tsunami deposit in Shetland

New geological investigation on Shetland has found evidence that tsunami events have occurred more frequently than previously thought. The Storegga Slide, a series of submarine landslips off the Norwegian coast 8200 years ago, caused a tsunami some 20m in height when it reached Shetland. Now BGS and Dundee University researchers, with funding from the Natural Environment Research Council,  have uncovered evidence of  two further tsunami events at approximately 5000 years ago and just 1500 years ago. Dr Sue Dawson of Dundee University has been using a High Definition Micro Computed Tomography scanner to build a 3D picture of core samples which point to the tsunamis being 13m above existing sea level. The detail will help Professor Dave Tappin of BGS in determining the source of the deposited material – were these large catastrophic events far away from Shetland or smaller events closer to home?

The research is part of the Landslide-Tsunami project, ongoing research that forms a key element of NERC’s Arctic Research programme.

Volcano Fun Day, Holyrood Park Edinburgh, Saturday 6 October 2018

Saturday 6 October, 11am – 4pm

The eight annual Volcano Fun Day is coming up, and every year it’s bigger and better! Join us for fun-filled, hands-on activity day to learn about Edinburgh’s volcanoes.

No booking required, contact the Holyrood Park Ranger Service for more information rangers@hes.scot or 0131 652 8150.

historicenvironment.scot/events

Midlothian Science Festival 6-20 October 2018

The Midlothian Science Festival is a two-week annual festival that aims to reach and inspire audiences of all ages in science. Its bold, engaging and exciting events take place in libraries, mills, churches, centres of learning and even a superstore and 90% of events are FREE! You can find out more on the Festival’s website at www.midlothiansciencefestival.com but here are details of events with a geological flavour:

Sunday 7 October 2018 12.30pm and 2.30pm from Vogrie House, Vogrie Country Park
Lost limestone quarries of Lothian
A walk with a geologist from Edinburgh University will reveal Midlothian’s long lost past tropical climate and the long lost industry of making lime for agriculture.
For all aged 12 yrs+          BOOK ONLINE FREE

Wednesday 17 October 2018 11am to 3pm at Dalkeith Library and Arts Centre
Dino & Rocks
Explore the fascinating world of a prehistoric time. Dig deep for fossils, create your own models of geological processes such as plate tectonics and erosion, and see a glacier in action! Learn about different rocks from around the world, from the high Himalayan mountains to the volcanos of Iceland. Create your own rock pet, plant your own jurassic fern, make your own dino feet, and discover where in the UK you can find dino footprints and fossils!
For all          DROP IN FREE  

Thursday 18 October 2018 2pm – 3pm at Penicuik Library
Exciting Eruptions
Come see our giant volcano erupting and have some seismic fun making your own papier maché erupting volcano to take home using kitchen ingredients!
For families          DROP IN FREE 

Friday 19 October 2018 4pm – 7 pm at IKEA, Loanhead
Let’s Explore Earth
Join Dynamic Earth and the National Museum of Scotland to explore the wonders of our planet. Investigate renewable energy with the National Museum, and get hands-on with building wind turbines and testing solar panels. And then take part in Dynamic Earth’s ‘Operation Earth’ programme and help to solve some of the challenges facing the land, air and oceans of our precious planet.
For all          DROP IN FREE 

Saturday 20 October 2018 10am – noon in Roslin Country Park
Rocks: a record of a swampy past
Midlothian was once a tropical swamp – and the evidence is in the rocks. A walk in Roslin Glen with a geologist from Edinburgh University will reveal all.
For all aged 12yrs+        BOOK ONLINE FREE

2018-19 Lecture Programme now online

scotlands energy trilemma roy thompsonWe’ve got a great line up of speakers in this year’s Lecture Programme, which starts on Wednesday 10th October and runs until Easter. Our Lectures are held on alternate Wednesday evenings, usually in the Hutton Lecture Theatre in the Grant Institute of Geology, The King’s Buildings. These are free and aimed at anyone with an interest in Earth science. Afterwards, you can join the speaker and members of the Society for a cup of tea and a chat.

Full details at www.edinburghgeolsoc.org/lectures/

EGS Public Lecture: What did the Ice Age ever do for us?

Wednesday 21 November, 6.30pm at Dynamic Earth

Edinburgh Castle Rock, a volcanic plug an important defensive site, carved by ice moving from west to east. Photo: Barbara Clarke

Scotland’s scenery has been shaped by moving ice and meltwater over hundreds of thousands of years, but the Ice Age has also affected the sea bed around Scotland and it influences today’s society in surprising ways.

This public lecture, organised by the Edinburgh Geological Society and Dynamic Earth, gives the opportunity to hear first-hand about recent advances in our understanding of the Ice Age in Scotland.

The event will be chaired and introduced by Hermione Cockburn, the scientific director at Dynamic Earth. Presenters are Carol Cotterill, Emrys Phillips (both from the British Geological Survey) and Tom Bradwell (Stirling University). Each speaker will give a short presentation outlining different aspects of the Ice Age, followed by a panel discussion with questions from the audience.

Venue: Dynamic Earth, Holyrood Road, Edinburgh EH8 8AS. Parking is available in the Dynamic Earth underground car park (charges apply).

Tickets £5, free for students and under 18s. Booking essential – reserve your tickets at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3616755