News

The latest news and information from EGS, including updates on our excursion and lecture programmes, and any other news we think you might find interesting or useful. Please let us know of anything important that we could share with others, by email or using our Contact Form.

New leaflet: Around Castle Rock

Around Castle Rock leafletLothian and Borders GeoConservation have launched their latest leaflet, Around Castle Rock, written by Andrew McMillan and available in printed format and as a free download from this website. Edinburgh Castle Rock developed as part of a volcano hundreds of millions of years before human occupation. Today it provides a spectacular backdrop to the centre of the City of Edinburgh. This booklet describes the geological processes which created the landscape of the city centre and a selection of stone-constructed buildings and monuments which form part of the city’s built heritage.

Download the new leaflet here …

sauropod footprint credit jon hoad

Exciting new Skye dinosaur footprint finds published in Scottish Journal of Geology

sauropod footprint credit jon hoad

Sauropod footprint credit Jon Hoad

A new article in the Scottish Journal of Geology (the academic journal published jointly by the Edinburgh and Glasgow Geological Societies) describes important new dinosaur tracksite at Rubha nam Brathairean (Brothers’ Point) on the Isle of Skye. Most of the prints were made by long-necked sauropods – which stood up to 2m (6.5ft) tall – and by theropods. Researchers measured, photographed and analysed about 50 footprints in a tidal area at Rubha nam Brathairean on the Trotternish peninsula. Analysis of the clearest prints enabled scientists to ascribe them to sauropods and theropods.

You can access the full article from the Scottish Journal of Geology website here, currently available as a free pdf download.

Holyrood Park image - Deep Time Walk

Deep Time at the Science Festival – 5, 6, 7 April

Holyrood Park image - Deep Time WalkThe Edinburgh Geological Society is delighted to be contributing to this year’s Science Festival with a unique event in Holyrood Park, exploring deep time, in association with the team behind the award-winning Deep Time Walk mobile app. Join us to walk 4.6 km, 1 metre for every million years of Earth history, guided and entertained by two characters – a scientist and a fool – in philosophical conversation about life, evolution and our place in the world.

Full details and tickets – www.sciencefestival.co.uk/event-details/deep-time-walk

Earth Day at Dynamic Earth Sunday 22 April

We’re taking part in Earth Day Celebrations at Dynamic Earth on Sunday 22 April. Come and celebrate with activities the whole family can enjoy … find out what roamed the Earth before we did with exciting hands-on drop in activities.

The event is free and open to all ages with some activities targeted specifically at younger audiences. Activities are available from 10am-4pm and are being run in partnership with Edinburgh University School of GeoSciences, Edinburgh Geological Society and Dynamic Earth.

 

Clough Medal 2017-2018

EGS President Bob Gatliff (right) presents the Clough Medal to Bob Holdsworth.

The Society were delighted to present Prof Robert Holdsworth with the Clough Medal before his lecture to the Society on Wednesday 21 February. This is the Society’s premier award, presented annually to a geologist whose original work has materially increased the knowledge of the geology of Scotland and/or the north of England, or who is Scottish by birth or by adoption and residence and has significantly advanced the knowledge of any aspect of geology. Bob Holdsworth has been awarded the Clough Medal for 2017-2018 in recognition of his exceptional contribution to research in structural geology and, in particular, in establishing the tectonic framework of the Moine rocks of Sutherland, together with many other notable achievements.

Fieldwork Grants – latest report

The Society supports geological fieldwork at home or abroad with grants from the Clough and Mykura Funds. We are always pleased to hear back about how the fieldwork went, and were delighted to receive a thorough and fascinating account from Bob Gooday about his visit to Alaska in 2017. Bob took part in the International Volcanological Summer School in Katmai National Park, Alaska. This involved staying in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes for ten days, looking at volcanic features in the Valley and the surrounding Katmai Cluster of volcanoes. The Katmai-Novarupta eruption in 1912 was the largest on Earth in the twentieth century, and completely filled a nearby valley with pyroclastic deposits. These deposits sustained intense fumarolic activity for several years, giving the valley its name. Bob notes that observation of the caldera formed during the Katmai eruption, and discussion of the processes at work have helped with his PhD work on a similar-sized, but much older, caldera system on Arran, western Scotland. So that’s at least one thing that Alaska and Arran have in common …

A mother brown bear with her cub on the shore of Naknek Lake at Brooks Lodge. Bob Gooday.

Annual General Meeting Wednesday 7 February, 7pm

The Annual General Meeting of the Society will be held at 7pm on Wednesday 7th February, followed by a lecture by Hannah Watkins on Predicting strain and fracture patterns in a fold-thrust belt, NW Scotland.

At the AGM, the following Council members are proposed for election:

Position

2017

Elect Jan 2018

President

Stuart Monro

Robert Gatliff

Vice-President

Robert Gatliff

Tom Challands

Vice-President

Emrys Phillips

Emrys Phillips

Immediate Past President

Christine Thompson

Stuart Monro

Honorary Secretary

Andrew Rushworth (acting)

Neil Mackenzie

Assistant Secretary (Annual Report)

Barbara Clarke (acting)

Don Cameron

Assistant Secretary (Minutes)

Richard Buxton

Richard Buxton

Honorary Treasurer

Christian Ranken

Christian Ranken*

Membership Secretary

Barbara Clarke

Bruce Mair

Lectures Secretary

Graham Leslie

Graham Leslie

Excursions Secretary

Vacant

Ian Kearsley

Assistant Secretary (Excursion Bookings)

Alison Tymon

Alison Tymon

Assistant Secretary (Planning & Finance)

Andrew Rushworth

Andrew Rushworth

Assistant Secretary (GeoConservation)

Mike Browne

Mike Browne

Assistant Secretary (Clough/Awards)

Graham Leslie

Graham Leslie

Assistant Secretary (Publications)

David Stephenson

David Stephenson

Publications Sales Officer

Don Cameron

Don Cameron

Librarian/Archivist

Vacant

Christine Thompson

Ordinary Member

Con Gillen

Con Gillen

Ordinary Member

Richard Smith

Barbara Clarke

Ordinary Member

Christopher Lofthouse

Christopher Lofthouse

Ordinary Member

Anastasia Polymeni

Anastasia Polymeni

Ordinary Member

Vacant

Vacant

Ordinary Member

Vacant

Vacant

Scientific Editor

Maarten Krabbendam

Maarten Krabbendam

Scientific Editor

Tom Challands

Tom Challands

Independent Examiner

J Cordery (Gibson McKerrell Brown)

*Christian Ranken will take a reduced workload through to Sept 2018, during which Don Cameron and Andrew Rushworth will cover certain aspects of the Treasurer’s role.

Public lecture – Prof James Jackson, 26 January

School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh – Planet Earth Distinguished Lecture Series 2018

Planet Earth is a series of distinguished lectures, which run annually, and each year an internationally renowned natural or social scientist working within the broad remit of GeoSciences is invited to deliver a series of engaging talks aimed at different audiences. This year Professor James Jackson from the University of Cambridge will be involved in a number of activities inspiring academics, professionals within the field of geosciences, students, and the local community.

Date: 26 January 2018
Time: 6pm-9pm
Place: National Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh

Professor Jackson will be giving a lecture entitled: 50 years of Plate Tectonics: why do people still die in earthquakes?

There will be a poster session 6-7pm prior to the main event, together with a post-reception from 8pm providing an excellent opportunity to meet with the speaker, key academics and researchers, industry and local government representatives all within the field of GeoSciences. We anticipate that this event will be popular, and therefore recommended early booking to ensure your place.

If you are interested in attending please register here. General Admission: £5.00.

More information at www.ed.ac.uk/geosciences/news/pl2018.

EGS supports Scotland’s Geodiversity Charter

The Edinburgh Geological Society is proud to support Scotland’s Geodiversity Charter, which sets out a vision that Scotland’s geodiversity is recognised as an integral and vital part of our environment, economy, heritage and future sustainable development, to be managed appropriately and safeguarded for this and future generations.

Following the success of the Charter when it was published in 2012, it has now been renewed for the next five years, with the support of almost 80 organisations across Scotland.

Lothian and Borders GeoConservation, a committee of the Edinburgh Geological Society, has worked with local authorities in our area to designate and publicise networks of Local Geodiversity Sites. This work is featured as a case study in the new Charter.

Fracking: discussion and reply

In the most recent edition of the Edinburgh Geologist, we published an article Can fracking, for gas and oil, power the Scottish economy? written by Roy Thompson from the School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh. We have now published a supplement for this edition, containing a discussion by Graham Dean and a reply by Roy Thompson. You can download the supplement here.

You can also listen to an interview with Roy Thompson with online Radio Ecoshock and read a follow-on article published online in Offshore Technology Focus magazine, issue 62.