Coldingham

This excursion will look at the Silurian rocks at Milldown Point and their relation to the adjacent Lower Devonian volcanic rocks: porphyrite and agglomerate. The Silurian rocks which crop out around Coldingham differ in character from those seen nearby and the main object of this excursion is to examine these rocks on the shore.

We will view the volcanic vent at St. Abbs Haven and then consider the nature of the Coldingham Beds and Linkim Beds at Milldown Point, their similarities or otherwise, and their relation to the volcanics. We will also visit Callercove Point to view the volcanic vent downfaulted against the Linkim Beds.


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Excursion title:

Coldingham

Date & time:

Saturday 16th June 9am

Finish time:

4.30pm Coldingham, 6pm Edinburgh

Leader:

Emrys Phillips, EGS

Excursion aims and description:

To examine the Silurian Coldingham and Linkim Beds exposed on the shore to the south of Coldingham Bay, looking particularly at structural features, with a view to establishing the origin of these enigmatic rocks.

Transport:

A coach will leave Waterloo Place at 9.00am to arrive at about 10.30am

Meeting point:

NGR for Car Park at Coldingham Bay NT 915 665

Coach route:

See above

Extra pick-up points:

Milton Road

First locality:

Car Park at St Vedas Hotel, Coldingham Bay NT 915 665

Excursion route:

From car park along shore to southeast, returning the same way; about 5km in total.

Terrain, walking distance, height gain:

Walking mostly on foreshore, shingle and rocks, ascents by footpath and along cliffs.

https://www.plotaroute.com/map/618284

Specific or Medium- / High-Risk Hazards:

Uneven walking on rocks on foreshore, may be slippery if wet. Some descents of grassy slopes.

Control measures required to mitigate against any Hazards referred to above:

Stout walking shoes/boots and walking poles if required.

Hard hats or Hi-viz clothing needed:

Hard hats recommended for some cliff sections.

May dogs be brought on the excursion?

No

Toilet information:

Toilet at Car Park (30p!) at start and finish of excursion

Geological map sheet:

1:50k Sheet 34 S & D Eyemouth

OS map sheet:

1:50k Sheet 67 Duns, Dunbar & Eyemouth

References:

Coldingham Excursion by DC Greig – Earthwise or Scottish Borders Geology Excursion Guide


Currie – Balerno circular

This excursion along minor roads and the Water of Leith walkway, will examine exposures of Lower Carboniferous Ballagan Formation exposed in stream sections and former railway cuttings. The walk will also view glacial and post-glacial landforms and investigate other aspects of the natural and man-made heritage of the area.


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Excursion title:

Currie to Balerno Circular

Date & time:

Wednesday 23 May 2018, 7 pm

Finish time:

9 pm approx

Leader:

Ken Shaw, EGS

Excursion aims and description:

1. To examine exposures of the Lower Carboniferous Ballagan Formation exposed in several stream sections and former railway cuttings

2. To view glacial / post-glacial landforms

3. To investigate other aspects of the natural and man-made heritage of the area

The excursion route is based on ‘Walk 5’ in reference 1.

Transport:

Lothian Buses No. 44, Curriehill Road stop (from town)

Lothian Buses No. 45, Curriehill Road stop (from town) or Riccarton Arms hotel (from P&R / H-W Uni.)

Meeting point:

At the small car-park at the start of the Kirkgate in Currie, south of the Water of Leith, just down from the Lanark Road West

First locality:

NT183677. Small car-park on Kirkgate to north of Water of Leith.

Excursion route:

Cross WoL and up to Lymphoy Road. West along Lymphoy Road to Balerno, then return along disused railway (WoL walkway) to start. Some detours to view stream sections & other points of interest.

Terrain, walking distance, height gain:

Mostly on metalled road or track. Some rough tracks and wet / slippy stream sections.

3.3m, 172ft ascent / descent. Shorter (1.6m) route possible in case of inclement weather.

Specific or Medium- / High-Risk Hazards:

Some slippery rocks and rough ground in stream sections

Control measures required to mitigate against any Hazards referred to above:

Appropriate footwear

Hard hats or Hi-viz clothing needed?

No

May dogs be brought on the excursion?

Yes

Toilet information:

Public house near meeting pint

Geological map sheet:

32W Livingston

OS map sheet:

1:25k sheet 350 1:50k sheet 66

References:

1. A Guide to Edinburgh’s Countryside: Habitats & walks within the city boundaries. Edinburgh Natural History Society, 1982. Macdonald Publishers, Edinburgh.

2. Mitchell, G.H. and Mykura, W. 1962. The Geology of the neighbourhood of Edinburgh, Third Edition. Memoirs of the Geological Survey, Scotland.


Siccar Point

Siccar PointThe promontory of Siccar Point is on a rocky and wild coastline just a few miles south of Dunbar, and is described as the most important geological site in the world. The site demonstrates an unconformity between two sets of sedimentary strata and was used by James Hutton to support his world-shaking ideas of geological time and natural processes. We will visit Old Red Sandstone exposures at Pease Bay before walking out to Siccar Point over a grassy field.

Aimed at new EGS members but open to all.


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Excursion title:

Introductory Excursion: Siccar Point

Date & time:

Saturday 8 September, 10 am

Finish time:

2 pm

Leaders:

Angus Miller and EGS Council Members

Excursion aims and description:

Siccar Point, described as the most important geological site in the world, demonstrates an unconformity between two sets of sedimentary strata and was used by James Hutton to support his world-shaking ideas of geological time and natural processes.

We will visit Old Red Sandstone exposures at Pease Bay before walking out to Siccar Point over a grassy field. This introductory excursion is aimed at new EGS members but it is open to all.

Transport:

Minibus

Meeting point:

Waterloo Place

Coach route:

A1 to Cockburnspath, park at Pease Bay

Extra pick-up points:

Milton Road, near junction with Park Avenue.

First locality:

Car park at the entrance to the Pease Bay Holiday Park, Cockburnspath TD13 5YP.

Excursion route:

Walk along Pease Bay to exposures at the west end of the beach. Walk from Siccar Point car park to Siccar Point.

Terrain, walking distance, height gain:

Rough paths and grassy fields.

Specific or Medium- / High-Risk Hazards:

Steep grassy slope above Siccar Point, which can be muddy and dangerous when wet.

Control measures required to mitigate against any Hazards referred to above:

Participants should only descend to Siccar Point if they are physically fit, properly equipped with walking boots and the conditions are suitable: dry grass, not windy.

Hard hats or Hi-viz clothing needed:

No

May dogs be brought on the excursion?

No

Toilet information:

Toilets and shop at Pease Bay.

Geological map sheet:

Eyemouth S34

OS map sheet:

67 Duns, Dunbar, Eyemouth

References:

Lothian Geology – an Excursion Guide (Edinburgh Geological Society, 1996), pp 146-151.

Siccar Point leaflet published by Lothian and Borders GeoConservation, 2015 – http://www.edinburghgeolsoc.org/publications/geoconservation-leaflets/

Route map – https://www.plotaroute.com/routecollection/363


Arthur’s Seat

Holyrood Park, Edinburgh. Photo: Angus Miller

The Arthur’s Seat volcano dominates the centre of Edinburgh and is a superb example of a small, partly-eroded basalt volcanic cone. It gives the opportunity of exploring different parts of the volcanic system including intrusions, lava flows and vent material. We will also visit Salisbury Crags to appreciate the contrast between surface volcanic activity and underground magma intrusion and the important site discovered by James Hutton.

Aimed at new EGS members but open to all.


Read the Code of Conduct and Safety Guidelines and book your place …

Excursion title:

Introductory Excursion: Arthur’s Seat

Date & time:

Sunday 27 May, 10 am

Finish time:

1 pm

Leader:

Angus Miller and EGS Council Members

Excursion aims and description:

The Arthur’s Seat volcano dominates the centre of Edinburgh and is a superb example of a small, partly-eroded basalt volcanic cone. It gives the opportunity of exploring different parts of the volcanic system including intrusions, lava flows and vent material. We will also visit Salisbury Crags to appreciate the contrast between surface volcanic activity and underground magma intrusion and the important site discovered by James Hutton. This introductory excursion is aimed at new EGS members but it is open to all.

Transport:

No transport necessary

Meeting point:

Holyrood Palace Car Park, on the Queens Drive

First locality:

Holyrood Palace Car Park, on the Queens Drive NT271 737

Excursion route:

St Anthony’s Well, Dry Dam, Whinny Hill, Queen’s Drive, Salisbury Crags.

Terrain, walking distance, height gain:

Rough paths and pavements.

Specific or Medium- / High-Risk Hazards:

None

Control measures required to mitigate against any Hazards referred to above:

None

Hard hats or Hi-viz clothing needed?

No

May dogs be brought on the excursion?

Yes

Toilet information:

Holyrood Park Education Centre, close to meeting point.

Geological map sheet:

Edinburgh 32E

OS map sheet:

Explorer 350

OS map sheet:

Discovering Edinburgh’s Volcano. A geological guide to Holyrood Park (EGS)


Aberlady shore

The excursion will examine Lower Carboniferous cyclical sediments from Middle Longcraig Limestone to Lower Skateraw Limestone along the foreshore from Aberlady Point to Craigielaw Point. We will interpret the environment for each bed from its lithology and fossils.


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Excursion title:

Aberlady shore

Date & time:

Wed 27 June 2018, 7 pm

Finish time:

9.30pm

Leader:

David McAdam & Fiona McGibbon, Edinburgh Geological Society

Excursion aims and description:

The excursion will examine Lower Carboniferous cyclical sediments from Middle Longcraig Limestone to Lower Skateraw Limestone along the foreshore from Aberlady Point to Craigielaw Point. We will interpret the environment for each bed from its lithology and fossils.

Transport:

Private cars -see below

Eastcoast buses X24 departs Semple Street 5,30, Waterloo Place 5.45, or each half hour earlier,

Meeting point:

Aberlady [NT465501] off bus at 6.45

Kilspindie Golf Club beach carpark [NT457504] at 7.00

First locality:

Aberlady Point [NT458502]

Excursion route:

Walk along road from Aberlady and along shore from golf club carpark, to Craigielaw Point and return

Terrain, walking distance, height gain:

Beach shingle and rocks, 2.5km, none

Specific or Medium- / High-Risk Hazards:

None

Control measures required to mitigate against any Hazards referred to above:

None

Hard hats or Hi-viz clothing needed?

No

May dogs be brought on the excursion?

Yes

Toilet information:

None

Geological map sheet:

33W Haddington solid

OS map sheet:

66 Edinburgh, Penicuik and North Berwick

References:

Lothian Geology – an Excursion Guide (Edinburgh Geological Society) pages 81-87


Calton Hill

Calton Hill. Photo: Angus Miller

Calton Hill is formed of basaltic lava and ash layers. The excursion will explore the geological features on Calton Hill and the geology of the local building stones and monuments. We will walk up to the top of the hill from Waterloo Place and back down to Regent Road.


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Excursion title:

Geology of Calton Hill and its surroundings

Date & time:

Wednesday 20 June 2018, 7 pm

Finish time:

 9 pm

Leader:

Richard Smith, Edinburgh Geological Society

Excursion aims and description:

Demonstrate the geological features on Calton Hill and the geology of the local building stones and monuments

Transport:

Own transport

Meeting point:

Foot of Calton Hill Steps

First locality:

Top of Calton Hill Steps [NT 261 741]

Excursion route:

Up past the monuments to the north side of the hill and back down to Regent Road and Waterloo Place

Terrain, walking distance, height gain:

Mainly on made paths but some steps, and grass slopes.

Walking up to 2 to 3 km, height gain up to 100 m

Specific or Medium- / High-Risk Hazards:

Take care crossing roads in the city. Watch out for steps, steep and grass slopes.

Control measures required to mitigate against any Hazards referred to above:

Wear stout walking boots or shoes

Hard hats or Hi-viz clothing needed?

Hi viz vests recommended

May dogs be brought on the excursion?

Not recommended

Toilet information:

In the city centre off Princes St

Geological map sheet:

BGS 1:50k Edinburgh Sheet 32E

OS map sheet:

1:50k Edinburgh Sheet 66

References:

Calton Hill Geological walk leaflet: Lothian and Borders RIGS Group


Dalkeith Buildings

Corn Exchange Museum, Dalkeith. Photo: Andrew McMillan

The historic Royal Burgh of Dalkeith has a large number of interesting stone buildings, dating back to the 15th century. This walking excursion along the paths and streets of Dalkeith will look at the use and source of building materials in the town. We can compare the weathering characteristics of the various rock types and see examples of techniques used to repair and conserve buildings. We shall see examples of locally quarried Upper Carboniferous sandstones as well as stone brought into the town from other parts of Scotland and further afield – a rich geodiversity on our doorsteps!


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Excursion title:

Dalkeith Built Heritage Walk

Date & time:

Wednesday 6 June 2018, 7.00 pm

Finish time:

9.00 pm

Leader:

Andrew McMillan, Lothian & Borders GeoConservation

Excursion aims and description:

The historic Royal Burgh of Dalkeith has a large number of interesting stone buildings, dating back to the 15th century. This walking excursion along the paths and streets of Dalkeith will provide a chance to look at the use and source of building materials in the town. We can compare the weathering characteristics of the various rock types and see examples of techniques used to repair and conserve buildings. We shall see examples of locally quarried Upper Carboniferous sandstones as well as stone brought into the town from other parts of Scotland and further afield – a rich geodiversity on our doorsteps!

Transport:

Several bus services to Dalkeith including Lothian Buses Nos. 3, 39, 40, and 49.

Meeting point:

Meet at 7.00 outside the Dalkeith Corn Exchange Museum building [NT333 675] in the High Street, Dalkeith.

First locality:

Outside Dalkeith Corn Exchange Museum building [NT333 675]. Street parking is available in Dalkeith High Street.

Excursion route:

Circular route around Dalkeith including High Street, Edinburgh Road, Lugton Bridge, Buccleuch Street, and Eskbank Road.

Terrain, walking distance, height gain:

Total distance of 4 km is mainly on pavements. Some busy roads will be crossed.

Specific or Medium- / High-Risk Hazards:

Walking on pavements next to roads with traffic, some short ascents and descents. Gravestones and ancient masonry in St Nicholas Churchyard.

Control measures required to mitigate against any Hazards referred to above:

Be aware of traffic – be diligent and look before crossing streets; take care on pavements which may be slippery especially in wet weather. Be aware of low-risk potential for collapse of unstable masonry.

Hard hats or Hi-viz clothing needed?

Hi-viz vests desirable; the leader will wear his.

May dogs be brought on the excursion?

Dogs may be brought provided they are kept on leads.

Toilet information:

Geological map sheet:

BGS 1: 50 000 32E Edinburgh

OS map sheet:

OS 1:50 000 sheet 66 Edinburgh, Explorer sheet 350

References:

Mitchell, G H and Mykura, W. 1962. The geology of the neighbourhood of Edinburgh. Memoirs of the Geological Survey, Scotland.


Bonaly

Torduff Hill, Pentlands. Photo: Angus Miller

The excursion aims to examine some of the Lower Devonian basalts and trachytes of the Pentland Hills Volcanic Formation, and rare exposures of rocks of the Kinnesswood and Ballagan formations (Carboniferous). The geological foundations for the local reservoirs of Torduff and Clubbiedean will be discussed.


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Excursion title:

Bonaly

Date & time:

Wednesday 9 May 2018, 7.00pm

Finish time:

9.00 pm

Leader:

Andrew McMillan, Lothian & Borders GeoConservation

Excursion aims and description:

The excursion aims to examine some of the Lower Devonian basalts and trachytes of the Pentland Hills Volcanic Formation. Rare exposures of rocks of the Kinnesswood and Ballagan formations (Carboniferous) may also be seen. The geological foundations for the local reservoirs of Torduff and Clubbiedean will be discussed.

Transport:

Lothian Bus No. 10 either to Torphin (alight in Woodhall Road at junction with Bonaly Road) or to Bonaly and alight at Bonaly Corner Shop (terminus). Walk up Bonaly Road to meeting point (below)

Meeting point:

Meet at 7.00 pm at the roadside car park on south side of Bonaly Road bridge over the A720 Edinburgh Bypass [NT 213 679] (there is no exit/slip from Bypass onto Bonaly Road; the nearest is Redford slip). Return to Bonaly Road bridge by 9.00 pm.

First locality:

Roadside car park on south side of Bonaly Road bridge over the A720 Edinburgh Bypass [NT 213 679] (there is no exit/slip from Bypass onto Bonaly Road; the nearest is Redford slip).

Excursion route:

Circular route around Torduff Reservoir. The walk goes firstly to the west end of Torduff Reservoir [NT 206 677] and then to the dam of Clubbiedean Reservoir before returning via Torduff Hill and the track leading north past Bonaly Tower.

Terrain, walking distance, height gain:

Total distance of 5 km is mainly on good tracks; some heathery moorland. Wear walking boots. Walking poles may be of assistance.

Specific or Medium- / High-Risk Hazards:

Walking on single track road with occasional traffic, and grassy or stoney public footpaths; some short moderately steep ascents and descents.

Control measures required to mitigate against any Hazards referred to above:

Be aware of traffic; take care on paths which may be slippery especially in wet weather

Hard hats or Hi-viz clothing needed?

No

May dogs be brought on the excursion?

Dogs may be brought provided they are kept on leads.

Toilet information:

Nearest public toilets in Colinton Village

Geological map sheet:

BGS 1: 50 000 32E Edinburgh

OS map sheet:

OS 1:50 000 sheet 66 Edinburgh, Explorer sheet 350

References:

Mitchell, G H and Mykura, W. 1962. The geology of the neighbourhood of Edinburgh. Memoirs of the Geological Survey, Scotland.

Mykura, W. p. 169-173 in McAdam, A D and Clarkson, E N K.1986. Lothian Geology – an Excursion Guide (Edinburgh Geological Society).

Sivasubrammaniam, A and Carter, V F. 1969. Investigation and treatment of leakage through Carboniferous rocks at Clubbiedean Dam, Midlothian Scottish Journal of Geology, Vol. 5, 208-223.


Ellen’s Glen

Ellen’s Glen. Photo: Al McGowan

This Local Geodiversity Site gives us the opportunity to look at some local Carboniferous geology (Lower Limestone Formation and W. Lothian Oil Shale Formation), and some aspects of the fluvial geomorphology of the Burdiehouse Burn. We will also consider the misfit nature of the present channel in relation to the valley, the local industrial archaeology and the historical built environment.


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Excursion title:

Ellen’s Glen

Date & time:

Wednesday 25 April 2018, 7 pm

Finish time:

9 pm

Leaders:

Al McGowan, Lothian & Borders GeoConservation

Excursion aims and description:

This Local Geodiversity Site gives us the opportunity to look at some local Carboniferous geology (Lower Limestone Formation and W. Lothian Oil Shale Formation), and some aspects of the fluvial geomorphology of the Burdiehouse Burn. We will also consider the misfit nature of the present channel in relation to the valley, the local industrial archaeology and the historical built environment.

Meeting point:

The party will meet at the first locality at the Moredun Woods gate on the corner of Ellen’s Glen Road and Gilmerton Road (A772) EH17 7QA.

Public transport by Lothian buses 3,8,29 to start of walk.

Excursion route:

The walk will follow the Burdiehouse Burn along paths from Moredun Woods to c0.8km south on good footpaths. Total walking distance c1.6km. Total ascent c75m.

Specific or Medium- / High-Risk Hazards:

none

Control measures required to mitigate against any Hazards referred to above:

none

Hard hats or Hi-viz clothing needed:

No

May dogs be brought on the excursion?

No

Toilet information:

Aldi store on Gilmerton Road.

Geological map sheet:

1:50k Sheet 32E

OS map sheet:

1:50k Sheet 66

References:

City of Edinburgh Local Nature Reserve entry https://www.edinburghoutdoors.org.uk/featureDetails.php?id=15%22

Mitchell, G.H.; Mykura, W.; Tulloch, W.; Knox, J. 1962. The geology of the neighbourhood of Edinburgh (Explanation of sheet 32) (Third Edition) (reprinted 1980).
http://pubs.bgs.ac.uk/publications.html?pubID=B01944


Dunbar to Belhaven

Dunbar. Photo: Fiona McGibbon

This excursion will examine the coastal rock sequences from the East Beach Dunbar to Belhaven Bay. We will encounter Devonian and Lower Carboniferous sedimentary rocks, and a range of extrusive and intrusive igneous rocks. We will see evidence for arid conditions and early land plants as well as lagoonal deposits of warmer times. The igneous rocks offer an array of field relations and textures from dykes to major vent structures. Several major faults are crossed, with a textbook example of a fault scarp. Note there is no coach for this excursion: travel to Dunbar by public transport or private car, meet in Dunbar at 10.30 am.


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Excursion title:

Dunbar to Belhaven

Date & time:

Saturday 18 August 10:30 am

Finish time:

3 pm

Leader:

Fiona McGibbon

Excursion aims and description:

The aims of the excursion are to examine the coastal rock sequences from the East Beach Dunbar to Belaven Bay. We will encounter Devonian and Lower Carboniferous sedimentary rocks, as well as a range of extrusive and intrusive igneous rocks. We will see evidence for arid conditions and early land plant as well as lagoonal deposits of warmer times. The igneous rocks offer an array of field relations and textures from dykes to major vent structures. Several major faults are crossed as well as a textbook example of a scarp.

Transport:

Train or bus services (X7,253) from Edinburgh to Dunbar, or private car.

Meeting point:

John Muir statue – High St. Dunbar

First locality:

East Beach – East Esplanade NT685785

Excursion route:

We will start at the East Beach and walk the coast in a westerly direction ending up at Belhaven Bay. We will take in both harbours, the old swimming pool area, the clifftop trail and Belhaven Bay.

Terrain, walking distance, height gain:

Total distance will be about 6km (including return walk). This is a coastal walk, so there is little height gain, although some flights of steps are encountered.

We will be walking on slippery rocks of the intertidal zone at times and along rough tracks at others.

Specific or Medium- / High-Risk Hazards:

Tides, slippery rocks of the intertidal zone.

Control measures required to mitigate against any Hazards referred to above:

We will mainly be walking on a falling tide. Low tide is at 14:20.

Please wear stout shoes with ankle support (hiking boots are ideal). Wear suitable outdoor clothing, carry rain and sun protection, bring a rucksack. If you use walking poles, please bring them.

Hard hats or Hi-viz clothing needed:

No

May dogs be brought on the excursion?

No dogs

Toilet information:

There are public toilets near the swimming pool on Bayswell Road

Geological map sheet:

33E

OS map sheet:

Landranger 67

References:

Lothian Geology – an Excursion Guide (Edinburgh Geological Society (p.119-132).

Geoconservation leaflet Dunbar Geology Walk available at http://www.edinburghgeolsoc.org/downloads/lbgcleaflet_dunbar.pdf